What This Professor Found Out About America's Mental Health System Is Insane

Dr. David Rosenhan decided to test the accuracy of mental health diagnosis in America. The results of his 1973 study are absolutely chilling.

OMG

Mike is ViralNova's resident Editor of the Weird. If it makes you say "OMG! That's terrible!!!" then Mike probably wrote it. Despite the subject of his articles Mike is surprisingly well adjusted. When he's not writing, he's making music, performing, and producing podcasts. Committing someone to a mental health facility against their will is never an easy thing to do. But if they're truly ill, then they need to get help. If it turns out that they weren't ill, then you can have faith that the doctors will eventually figure it out and release them...right?

Well, if the results of this 1973 experiment are to be believed, I wouldn't count on it.

In 1973, Stanford professor Dr. David Rosenhan began to wonder about the validity of psychiatric diagnosis. After some contemplation, he conducted an experiment to test his theory.

For the first part of his study, Rosenhan assembled a small team of "psuedopatients."

For the first part of his study, Rosenhan assembled a small team of "psuedopatients." iStock

However, once inside the facility, they acted completely normal and continually told the doctors that they felt fine.

However, once inside the facility, they acted completely normal and continually told the doctors that they felt fine. iStock

After the results of this study became public, a disgruntled hospital administrator maintained that these sorts of mistakes could never happen at his hospital and challenged Rosenhan to test him.

After the results of this study became public, a disgruntled hospital administrator maintained that these sorts of mistakes could never happen at his hospital and challenged Rosenhan to test him. iStock

So he did.

So he did. iStock

(via Wikipedia)

Naturally, Rosenhan's findings stirred up quite a bit of controversy. When he published the piece, he called for reforms to be put in place, but not many of them actually made it all the way to implementation.